Category Archives: Iceland

Exploring the east of Iceland

Exploring the east of Iceland

Article by Asberg Jonsson

Iceland today has the reputation to be the land with the greatest variety in whole Europe. One can find landscapes from surreal to sublimes. The colors of Iceland include rust red craters, blue lakes, green mosses and the sea of black sand. Iceland is worth seeing in every direction. There is a new thing with every step a tourist takes in any direction of Iceland. Let’s check out Iceland in its eastern part i.e. EAST ICELAND

In this part of Iceland one can find those things which make Iceland a special place for every visitor. Infact, something more than that, which includes amazing natural beauty from glaciers to a sea, barren sand fields, valleys of woodlands and some very unique vegetation. One can also see big and famous towns, geothermal pools etc. This huge variety is visible in society and culture of this part of Iceland. One can enjoy fishing for salmon fishes, swimming, spotting birds, hiking in mountains, and not to forget, good food here in eastern Iceland. One very special thing about east Iceland is that one can see Icelandic reindeers in some wild areas here. The special thing is that they live only in this part of Iceland.

This part of Iceland is considered a paradise for hiking freaks. People there are proud of this facility given by nature. The possibilities include hiking in some uninhabited areas as well as short route hiking towards vegetated valley, over open sands and along the sea shore. There is everything here that will suit everyone who is going for a one day hiking tour or a ten day hiking tour. East Iceland is also famous as deep fjords are present here. These fjords extend between high mountain sides with sloping tertiary basalt strata. Woodlands of east Iceland is another special attraction of east Iceland. Skaftafell national park has some of Iceland’s most beautiful and highest growing birch, which is served by nature for ages now. Forest in Hallormsstaour is Iceland’s leading woodland. Green groves of trees are becoming enormously famous now and it is believed that every traveler will definitely stop to enjoy the natural vegetation and wind shelter. Vatnajokull, Europe’s largest glacier is present here in east Iceland. This glacier has shaped the environment and the history of eastern Iceland for hundreds of years now. Most of the rivers in Iceland run from this glacier. Europe’s biggest national park, Skaftafell Park, was made here in 2004 and the southern part of this glacier was included in this park. In the northern part of this glacier one can witness the combination of two most powerful forces of the nature. The fire and the glacial ice, as the most active volcano of Iceland are present here. But tourists must take precautions before going to this glacier and should have some general information from professional trip advisors. Mount bulandstindur is a pyramid shaped basaltic mountain which rises up to amazing 6,130 foots. In east Iceland, it is considered a legendary force of mystical powers and energy. Some small towns and villages like djupivogur, breiddalsvik, egilsstadir town and bakkagardi are also some of the most watched places in eastern Iceland. East Iceland heritage museum is located in Egilsstadir town. It displays some very fascinating artifacts found in this part of Iceland. The most famous is a 1000 years old Viking’s gravesite and his silver remnants.

There is no doubt that east Iceland has got everything a tourist expects, when he visits some country like Iceland. But this is all explored and believe me there is so much which has not been explored and left for tourists to explore for themselves and feel the proud of exploring something new and amazing from this nature.

About the Author

Asberg Jonsson is the manager of Iceland Visitor, a company specializing in packages for Vacation in Iceland and day tours in Iceland. For more information visit www.icelandvisitor.com

Icelandic Movies And Icelandic Music Online

Icelandic Movies And Icelandic Music Online

Article by Vikram Kuamr

One way that you can get to know a different country like Iceland is to look for Icelandic movies and Icelandic music online. Fortunately, the internet makes it easy to shop for Icelandic products by making Iceland shops open to anyone who wants get to know something about the culture of Iceland.

If you really want to learn something about a country, one way to discover all about it is by taking in the films and music that are so important to the culture. Icelandic movies are easy to purchase and can come with subtitles for those who wish to view them but do not speak the language. You can purchase Icelandic movies when you go to an Iceland shop online.

Another way to celebrate the culture of a country is to enjoy the music. In addition to buying Icelandic movies, you can also purchase Icelandic music when you go online. Music is a universal language and you will find that you will feel as though you are visiting the country of Iceland as you listen to Icelandic music.

In addition to buying Icelandic music and movies, you can also purchase foods from Iceland when you shop online. There are few ways to know a people better than by eating their food. In addition to candy that is unique to this region of the world, you can also explore the culinary side of Iceland when you decide to shop Iceland online.

The internet has made it easier for people from other countries to explore countries that are not their own simply by going online. Anyone who wants to get an idea of what it is like in the country of Iceland can do so by shopping for Icelandic products right from their home computer. This allows you to have a virtual tour of the country, without having to leave your own.

For those who are from Iceland and miss the music, movies and treats from their native country, they no longer have to be apart from the things they love, thanks to the internet. Those expatriates who are living in another part of the world other than Iceland can feel that much closer to home by getting Icelandic movies and music as well as foods right online.

Anyone who wants to explore the fascinating culture that is found in the country of Iceland can now easily do so by shopping online. You will feel as though you have traveled to the country itself when you shop Iceland online. You can revel in the foods as well as the Icelandic movies and music right in your own home when you go online and look for an Iceland shop.

If you like to explore new cultures and want to virtually travel, the internet makes it easier than ever to do so. For those who want to explore the culture of Iceland, as well as those who are from this region of the world and want to get the products from their home, it is now possible to shop Iceland and purchase Icelandic music, movies, food and candy, no matter where in the world you happen to be living.

About the Author

If you want to experience Icelandic culture, there is no better way to do so than by getting Icelandic movies and music. To purchase Icelandic music and movies as well as foods and candy, go to Nammi.

Iceland Tourist Guide – Volume 1 – General Information

Iceland Tourist Guide – Volume 1 – General Information

Article by Dagur Jonsson

With the rise of Iceland as a premier tourist destination of the world, there is more and more interest amongst travelers from all over the globe to learn more about this enchanting North Atlantic country situated in the western most part of Europe. Most search engines report a rising number of search queries asking for more information about Iceland – from general facts about Iceland, to its history, culture and of course places of tourist interest.

As an ongoing feature in providing more information for tourists who are interested in Iceland, we shall first look at the general information of Iceland.

Independence

Iceland officially gained independence on 17th June 1944 from Denmark with the repealing of the December 1918 Act of Union. During the 2nd world war since the German troops occupied Denmark, the British troops landed in Iceland in order to stop the Germans from taking over the country. At around the same time people of Iceland demanded more control over their country and thus got official independence on 17th June 1944.

Government

The President of Iceland is Mr. Olafur Ragnar Grimson (since 1 August 1996) and the Prime Minister is Mr. Geir H. Haarde (since 7 June 2006)

Capital

The capital of Iceland is the charming city of Reykjavík which has all the qualities of a great city but at the same time has an abundance of unspoiled natural beauty.

Population

Iceland has an estimated population of three hundred thousand (300,000) with almost about two hundred thousand people (200,000) living in or near the capital city of Reykjavík. Population density is one of the least in Iceland with only 2 people per square kilometer – 1.2 persons per square mile. 91 percent of the population live in urban areas whereas 9 percent live in the rural areas.

Religion

About 86% of the people in Iceland follow the Evangelical Lutheran church.

Landscape

Iceland has a total area of about 103,000 km² or 39,756 sq. mi. Most of the island is covered by a large plateau. The coastal areas are quite grassy lowlands allowing the people to live, grow crops and graze sheeps etc. The inland plateau is rugged and barren and about 2500 feet above sea level. A fault line runs across Iceland which gives rise to volcanoes, hot springs, steaming geysers, glaciers, and radiant lava fields.

Weather

The weather in Iceland, contrary to popular belief is quite moderate. The Gulf Stream keeps the ports warm and free of ice throughout the year. Average temperatures range from 12 degrees centigrade in July at Reykjavík and are a bit warmer in the north and east of Iceland. There is not much snow in Reykjavík even during the winters but the north and east sides along with the West Fjords receive a heavier snowfall.

Language

Official language of Iceland is Icelandic but most of the population especially those in their teenage years through to people in their fifties speak fluent English

Currency

The Icelandic monetary unit is the krona (plural kronur) (ISK). The coins come in 5 denominations of 100kr, 50kr, 10kr, 5kr and 1kr. The bank notes come in 4 denominations of 5000kr, 2000kr, 1000kr and 500kr.
About the Author

Dagur Jonsson is the editor of Iceland Guest, a website specializing in tourist information for travelers to Iceland. For more information visit www.icelandguest.com

The Icelandic – Is It A Pony Or Is It A Horse?

The Icelandic – Is It A Pony Or Is It A Horse?

Article by Crystal A. Eikanger

Known by many names such as Islenzki Hesturinn, Icelandic Toelter Horse, Iceland T?lter, and its own country’s name, Islandpferde, the Icelandic Horse has lived in Iceland since the Nordic pioneers arrived in 865 A.D. and it has been purebred since the 10th century. Since the horse is sacred in Norse mythology, this horse is the only breed in Iceland because of an ancient Viking law disallowing any other horses into the country, and that law is still upheld today. Once an Icelandic Horse has been taken out of Iceland it can never return. Additionally, only unused horse equipment may be brought into the country. This is to prevent an outbreak of equine disease which could decimate the population on the tiny island. Diseases are almost unknown among Icelandic horses that may not be able to fend off something new. But it is this isolation which has led to the breed’s purity. Outside Iceland, the genetic purity of the horses is carefully maintained through national registries in each country to track the breed according to strict regulations of the Icelandic government.

Comparisons between the Icelandic horse at the time of the settlement of Iceland, and the ancient Norwegian and German horses show them to have similar bone structures, and it is possible that there was a separate species of horse, Equus scandianavicus, found in those areas. These Scandinavian horses were later crossed with other European breeds, but not in Iceland, and so the breed remained pure on the island. During the time that the Vikings took the horses to Iceland, the easy gaits were common throughout horse breeds in Europe, but the Icelandic Horse genotype is very different from other European horse populations, so theories of them having Shetland blood, Highland or Eriskay blood are not likely to be true.

The Icelandic is classified as a horse, not as a pony. This is because it is the only equine in Iceland and there is not a word for “pony” in the language, therefore it’s called a horse. But of the 27 characteristics that apply to all pony breeds, all of them apply to Icelandic Horses. So, if someone calls it an Icelandic Pony, they are biologically correct.

In the early 1900’s the Icelandic horse was used extensively for transportation and as a work horse to clear fields and herd livestock. The first breed societies for the Icelandic Horse were formed in 1904 with the first registry being formed in 1923. Then in the early 20th century, automobiles came to Iceland and because the horses were considered obsolete, much of the breed was slaughtered en masse until the 1940’s and 1950’s. Fortunately, rescue organizations worked to protect the Icelandic breed and exported many horses to new homes outside of the country while establishing legal protections for the equines within Iceland. Forty years ago, there were no Icelandic Horses in continental Europe, but now there are 100,000. Only about 3,000 are in the United States but it is a growing breed with more being imported all the time. Around 80,000 Icelandic horses remain in Iceland.

The Icelandic Horse has been rediscovered in its native country and is recognized as a unique family and sport horse in modern Iceland where they are now highly prized and used for recreational riding much more than for fieldwork. Despite its small size, averaging 12.2 to 14.2 hands tall, this Viking Horse is tough enough to carry a 300-pound man and can bear 1.6 times its own weight. The Icelandic Horse can be used in various activities from riding, jumping, dressage and driving. Traditional Icelandic tack (which resembles English tack) is recommended since this style fits the breed physically and allows the horse to move correctly although they are able to perform well under other types of equipment.

Although breeding for show and riding is the main objective, breeding for meat production is also occurring. Horse meat was once a very valuable product, but due to increased competition and decreased popularity much of the meat is now exported to Japan.

Icelandic Horses love to swim and this is a prime example of its gentleness and strength. It is a nice break on a hot summer day and the horse will gently carry its passenger as it swims swiftly and easily through the water with its powerful legs, through a calm lake, a river, or even an ocean. In winter, Icelandic Horses are shod with studs on their shoes. In areas where it is cold enough to ride a horse across frozen lakes, the Icelandic is able to perform all five gaits on sheer ice.

Ponying is the practice of riding one horse while leading others to exercise them or to allow the rider to switch horses when the ridden horse gets tired. The rider is usually in the center with horses being led on either side. Most breeds demand personal space and won’t cooperate well with this closeness, but Icelandic horses naturally bond and travel in communities so they allow this joyful exercise.

Because Iceland has no predators, but instead has quicksand, rock slides, volcanoes, etc, the ability to assess a situation intelligently rather than run away from it appears to have been central to the horse’s survival. Since they have no fear of living things, they seek strong attachments to people and are quite nurturing and affectionate.

Icelandics cannot be ridden until age 5; stop growing at age 7, and perform best when in their twenties. Broodmares often produce foals well into their late 20’s. Even though they mature later, they live longer than most breeds, with 35-40 years being common. The oldest living horse, Thulla, was an Icelandic who died at age 57 when she stopped eating after her elderly owner passed away. This dramatically attests to the phenomenal bonding capabilities of the Icelandic Horse.

Some of the desirable conformation points of an Icelandic horse are a long neck and a full, thick mane, forelock and tail. Their manes and tails are so full and the hair is so coarse that it rarely tangles. The Icelandic coat is sleek in the summer and fuzzy like a teddy bear in the winter, but the abundant flowing mane and tail are kept year round. Over 42 different color patterns and combinations, including white and pinto are acceptable for the Icelandic horse, with only the Appaloosa markings missing from the mix.

Icelandic horses are five-gaited and their greatest asset is the extra surefootedness added by the horse’s ability to move its feet in any order which allows them to maneuver safely through all kinds of terrain. In addition to the Walk, Trot and Canter, the Icelandic horse has two unique gaits and is one of the few horses known to be ridden and driven in all five basic gaits. The T?lt, or single-foot, is an amazingly smooth gait where all four feet move in the same independent pattern as in the walk but with higher action and more speed; like an accelerated high stepping running walk that is smooth and flowing that some equestrians compare to racking. T?lting is often performed carrying full beer mugs without spilling a drop and is a trademark of the breed.

The Flying Pace, known variously as Skeith, skeio or skold, is a lateral gait where the front and hind legs on the same side move forward and back at the same time with such speed that there is a brief period in which all four feet are off the ground as if flying. The Icelandic Horse is the only breed that performs this gait. Like the pace of the American Standardbred, the Icelandic has been clocked at 35 miles per hour, but unlike the Standardbred, the Icelandic’s gait is comfortable to sit, therefore Icelandic Horses are raced at Flying Pace under saddle, not pulling a sulky. Not every Icelandic Horse displays this gait, because it requires careful development in the horse and must not be rushed before the muscles necessary for this powerful gait are fully developed. Training by any artificial methods is strictly forbidden.

All breed standards, registrations and competition activities are strictly regulated by the F?deration Europ?ischer Islandpferde Freunde (FEIF or International Federation of Friends of the Icelandic Horse) that was formed in 1969 to regulate the uniformity of the Icelandic breed world-wide. Currently there are 18 member countries in the FEIF. The United States Icelandic Horse Congress (USIHC) maintains the Registry of purebred Icelandic Horses in the U.S. in accordance with FEIF rules. Other Icelandic Horse organizations within a country are allowed, but only as social or promotional entities.

About the Author

Crystal is a writer for www.HorseClicks.com, classifieds of Icelandic Horses for sale in Iceland, California, etc.

The Natural Mystery That is Iceland

The Natural Mystery That is Iceland

Article by buy order cialis Fast Asleep Strips online Jessica







One nation which is shrouded in much mystery is Iceland. Iceland is situated at the incredibly edge on the European continent. It floats isolated from the cold waters on the North Atlantic Ocean. The capital and the biggest town in Iceland is Reykjavik. While Iceland has its own history and lifestyle, it was founded by Scandinavian settler around 900 AD. This can be apparent to date as Icelandic, a Germanic language, is a whole lot much in-line with Faroese and some Norwegian dialects. Iceland is often thought to be a frontier land since it is component of the Arctic Circle. Not a lot of folks know how a lot organic beauty can be found right here.

Iceland is quite steeped in culture and in healthy wonders. It’s so numerous untouched healthy formations. Any nature lover can be astounded plus the massiveness and beauty of the many land and water formations listed here. Glacier and volcanoes are a specialty of Iceland. The most popular of these need to be Eyjafjallajökull. Eyjafjallajökull is an island-mountain glacier. It’s one of Iceland’s smallest glaciers. It also happens to be a very active volcano. Eyjafjallajökull gained fame in 2010 as it erupted and impeded traveling by plane in Europe for the longest time.

Other worthwhile locations to go to in Iceland are their numerous geothermal plants and geysers. As Iceland is a highly volcanic land, geothermal energy and geysers is really a huge point listed here. In case you sense like you happen to be too cold from the frigid weather, feel at liberty to enjoy one of the many healthy hot springs discovered below in Iceland. This is one of the finest issues you possibly can encounter in Iceland.

Icelanders are known to have one or more of the longest life expectancies in the world. Why wouldn’t they? Everything is perfect in Iceland. You’ll perpetually reside in solemnity and peace.



About the Author

Journey around the world by visiting famouswonders.com and while you’re at it, also check out liechtenstein.

The Icelandic – Is It A Pony Or Is It A Horse?

The Icelandic – Is It A Pony Or Is It A Horse?

Known by many names such as Islenzki Hesturinn, Icelandic Toelter Horse, Iceland Tцlter, and its own country’s name, Islandpferde, the Icelandic Horse has lived in Iceland since the Nordic pioneers arrived in 865 A.D. and it has been purebred since the 10th century. Since the horse is sacred in Norse mythology, this horse is the only breed in Iceland because of an ancient Viking law disallowing any other horses into the country, and that law is still upheld today. Once an Icelandic Horse has been taken out of Iceland it can never return. Additionally, only unused horse equipment may be brought into the country. This is to prevent an outbreak of equine disease which could decimate the population on the tiny island. Diseases are almost unknown among Icelandic horses that may not be able to fend off something new. But it is this isolation which has led to the breed’s purity. Outside Iceland, the genetic purity of the horses is carefully maintained through national registries in each country to track the breed according to strict regulations of the Icelandic government.

Comparisons between the Icelandic horse at the time of the settlement of Iceland, and the ancient Norwegian and German horses show them to have similar bone structures, and it is possible that there was a separate species of horse, Equus scandianavicus, found in those areas. These Scandinavian horses were later crossed with other European breeds, but not in Iceland, and so the breed remained pure on the island. During the time that the Vikings took the horses to Iceland, the easy gaits were common throughout horse breeds in Europe, but the Icelandic Horse genotype is very different from other European horse populations, so theories of them having Shetland blood, Highland or Eriskay blood are not likely to be true.

The Icelandic is classified as a horse, not as a pony. This is because it is the only equine in Iceland and there is not a word for “pony” in the language, therefore it’s called a horse. But of the 27 characteristics that apply to all pony breeds, all of them apply to Icelandic Horses. So, if someone calls it an Icelandic Pony, they are biologically correct.

In the early 1900’s the Icelandic horse was used extensively for transportation and as a work horse to clear fields and herd livestock. The first breed societies for the Icelandic Horse were formed in 1904 with the first registry being formed in 1923. Then in the early 20th century, automobiles came to Iceland and because the horses were considered obsolete, much of the breed was slaughtered en masse until the 1940’s and 1950’s. Fortunately, rescue organizations worked to protect the Icelandic breed and exported many horses to new homes outside of the country while establishing legal protections for the equines within Iceland. Forty years ago, there were no Icelandic Horses in continental Europe, but now there are 100,000. Only about 3,000 are in the United States but it is a growing breed with more being imported all the time. Around 80,000 Icelandic horses remain in Iceland.

The Icelandic Horse has been rediscovered in its native country and is recognized as a unique family and sport horse in modern Iceland where they are now highly prized and used for recreational riding much more than for fieldwork. Despite its small size, averaging 12.2 to 14.2 hands tall, this Viking Horse is tough enough to carry a 300-pound man and can bear 1.6 times its own weight. The Icelandic Horse can be used in various activities from riding, jumping, dressage and driving. Traditional Icelandic tack (which resembles English tack) is recommended since this style fits the breed physically and allows the horse to move correctly although they are able to perform well under other types of equipment.

Although breeding for show and riding is the main objective, breeding for meat production is also occurring. Horse meat was once a very valuable product, but due to increased competition and decreased popularity much of the meat is now exported to Japan.

Icelandic Horses love to swim and this is a prime example of its gentleness and strength. It is a nice break on a hot summer day and the horse will gently carry its passenger as it swims swiftly and easily through the water with its powerful legs, through a calm lake, a river, or even an ocean. In winter, Icelandic Horses are shod with studs on their shoes. In areas where it is cold enough to ride a horse across frozen lakes, the Icelandic is able to perform all five gaits on sheer ice.

Ponying is the practice of riding one horse while leading others to exercise them or to allow the rider to switch horses when the ridden horse gets tired. The rider is usually in the center with horses being led on either side. Most breeds demand personal space and won’t cooperate well with this closeness, but Icelandic horses naturally bond and travel in communities so they allow this joyful exercise.

Because Iceland has no predators, but instead has quicksand, rock slides, volcanoes, etc, the ability to assess a situation intelligently rather than run away from it appears to have been central to the horse’s survival. Since they have no fear of living things, they seek strong attachments to people and are quite nurturing and affectionate.

Icelandics cannot be ridden until age 5; stop growing at age 7, and perform best when in their twenties. Broodmares often produce foals well into their late 20’s. Even though they mature later, they live longer than most breeds, with 35-40 years being common. The oldest living horse, Thulla, was an Icelandic who died at age 57 when she stopped eating after her elderly owner passed away. This dramatically attests to the phenomenal bonding capabilities of the Icelandic Horse.

Some of the desirable conformation points of an Icelandic horse are a long neck and a full, thick mane, forelock and tail. Their manes and tails are so full and the hair is so coarse that it rarely tangles. The Icelandic coat is sleek in the summer and fuzzy like a teddy bear in the winter, but the abundant flowing mane and tail are kept year round. Over 42 different color patterns and combinations, including white and pinto are acceptable for the Icelandic horse, with only the Appaloosa markings missing from the mix.

Icelandic horses are five-gaited and their greatest asset is the extra surefootedness added by the horse’s ability to move its feet in any order which allows them to maneuver safely through all kinds of terrain. In addition to the Walk, Trot and Canter, the Icelandic horse has two unique gaits and is one of the few horses known to be ridden and driven in all five basic gaits. The Tцlt, or single-foot, is an amazingly smooth gait where all four feet move in the same independent pattern as in the walk but with higher action and more speed; like an accelerated high stepping running walk that is smooth and flowing that some equestrians compare to racking. Tцlting is often performed carrying full beer mugs without spilling a drop and is a trademark of the breed.

The Flying Pace, known variously as Skeith, skeio or skold, is a lateral gait where the front and hind legs on the same side move forward and back at the same time with such speed that there is a brief period in which all four feet are off the ground as if flying. The Icelandic Horse is the only breed that performs this gait. Like the pace of the American Standardbred, the Icelandic has been clocked at 35 miles per hour, but unlike the Standardbred, the Icelandic’s gait is comfortable to sit, therefore Icelandic Horses are raced at Flying Pace under saddle, not pulling a sulky. Not every Icelandic Horse displays this gait, because it requires careful development in the horse and must not be rushed before the muscles necessary for this powerful gait are fully developed. Training by any artificial methods is strictly forbidden.

All breed standards, registrations and competition activities are strictly regulated by the Fцderation Europдischer Islandpferde Freunde (FEIF or International Federation of Friends of the Icelandic Horse) that was formed in 1969 to regulate the uniformity of the Icelandic breed world-wide. Currently there are 18 member countries in the FEIF. The United States Icelandic Horse Congress (USIHC) maintains the Registry of purebred Icelandic Horses in the U.S. in accordance with FEIF rules. Other Icelandic Horse organizations within a country are allowed, but only as social or promotional entities.

Crystal is a writer for www.HorseClicks.com, classifieds of Icelandic Horses for sale in Iceland, California, etc.