Category Archives: Iceland

The great Mount Hekla of Iceland

The great Mount Hekla of Iceland

Article by Bjorn Olav Jonsson

Mount Hekla, an active volcano situated in Iceland is famous all over the world. According to ancient stories narrated by some old men there, it is believed that its crater was the way to hell for the ill-natured souls. The entire range of mount Hekla is around forty kilometers long in stretch and the crack that emits lava and gas is around 6 kilometers wide. The height of this mountain is somewhere around 1491 meters and is still rising.

According to experts, in the last 7000 years, this volcano has five big fissure explosions. It is assumed that eruptions occurred 4000 years back and 2800 years back were the biggest and the worst of them all. Hints of these two eruptions are still visible very clearly in the soils of northern and north-eastern Iceland. It was 2800 years ago that the biggest layer of tephra formed from a single eruption fall. This layer of tephra covered more than 80 percent of the country and its volume was 12 cubic kilometers. This layer of tephra also spread in major part of Scandinavian countries and other parts of Europe as well.

It is said that the last twenty eruptions in mount Hekla occurred after the settlement of Iceland. The first and the biggest were seen in 1104 A.D. there were many eruptions recorded during the era of the great Vikings. In 20th century, mount Hekla has shown its aggression four times and last time in 1991. The last time an eruption was seen was in the year 2000. The effects of the last eruption in 2000 were horrible. Entire country was covered by the ash flown out from the volcano. It became very difficult for people living there as the conditions were very hard. The entire grassland became poisonous by that ash and number of cattle died after eating that grass. As far as Mount Hekla is concerned, all the ice and snow that was gathered on tip in course of time was melted completely creating a flood like situation. Huge amount of pumice was gathered to stop the flow of water.

Despite of all this odds, mount Hekla is very famous among the adventure freaks. People love to hike to the top of this volcano when the weather conditions are complimentary. It takes three or four hours to complete the hiking of 900 meters. On a bright sunny day, view from that mountain is breath-taking and fantastic. Everything connected to hiking is available here and people also tend to bring their own to avoid the problems of time limits. The only condition made by the government is that one has to be in good health to hike this mountain. One should also check the weather forecast before starting their trip. The weather of Iceland can change very quickly so it’s better if you bring your protection gear along with you. There are some directions and signs that show that this mount is on a boil and can erupt any time. Check them before and avoid hiking if they are negative.

Again some old men say that on Easter nights, mount Hekla becomes a place where witches gather and party, so be careful of them if by chance you are near there at Easter time.

About the Author

Bjorn Olav Jonsson is a freelance writer. For further information visit the website, www.icelandguest.com.

Landmarks For a Reykjavik Holiday

Landmarks For a Reykjavik Holiday

Article by Vikki Beale

On a city break to Reykjavik you are sure to enjoy the city’s unique architecture and landmarks that reflect the distinctive landscape that you’ll explore on your Iceland holidays. Reykjavik has historic and modern buildings to visit, all of which have a style that is uniquely Icelandic.

hallgrimskirkja-2Hallgrimskirkja Church

One landmark that you will always be aware of on your city break to Reykjavik is the striking tower of Hallgrimskirkja Church. As one of the tallest buildings you’ll see on your Reykjavik holiday, reaching a height of 73 metres, it is an unmistakeable presence. The church, which is mostly white, has an unusual design with a skirt that cascades down from the spire merging into the ribbed walls. This has the effect of making the church resemble a space shuttle about to launch, although the intent of the designer was to emulate the texture of the basalt lava fields that you can see throughout the country. Whatever you make of it, the views of the city from the top are unrivalled, and you may be lucky enough to catch one of the classical concerts that are occasionally held here. If you like the sound of the Hallgrimskirkja, one of Reykjavik’s hotels called ‘Adam’ is just next door.

HöfðiHofdi House

A less assuming building, but just as important, is the Hofdi House. The house is a hundred years old, with white wooden facia, and distinctive gables, a look that strikes a balance between respectability and quaintness. This was the venue for the historic summit of Ronald Regan and Mikhail Gorbachev where in 1986 they set about ending the Cold War, and it is not open to the public because it is still used for the municipal business of Reykjavik. Holidaymakers should still take a look, however; a millionaire from Japan thought it so pretty that he had a copy of it made for his own use.

RáðhúsiðCity Hall

If you enjoy the atmosphere of official buildings, the City Hall is worth a visit too. You can access this building all week and make use of the cafe and see the art exhibitions. The City Hall, where the Mayor of Reykjavik does his nine to five, is set on the edge of Lake Tjornin, and is another example of interesting architecture. The water seems to rise up to meet the glass walls, as do the swans and ducks, which you can see paddling around the walkways and the curved modern building. One of the halls contains a map worth looking at as you begin your holidays: Iceland and Reykjavik modelled in large scale so you can walk around it and give yourself a sense of the island’s shape.If you like the City Hall’s glassy and shiny design, you might do well to choose the 4th Floor Hotel from the Reykjavik hotels available. It has a similar contemporary feel with modern styled interior.

EsjanMount Esja

But you shouldn’t spend too much time inside on your holiday in Reykjavik, indeed a city break to Reykjavik need not be restricted to the urban areas. Mount Esja hangs in the distance across the water, and since the city has relatively few tall buildings, the mountain imposes itself on the horizon. Mount Esja is a popular place to walk and the routes are forgiving in terms of difficulty, rewarding hikers with amazing views of the countryside.

grasagardurThe Laugardalur Valley

The Laugardalur Valley, where the city keeps its sports fields and stadium, zoo and botanical gardens is another place to take in nature while on your city break to Reykjavik. A popular feature is the outdoor hot spring pool where you can swim throughout the seasons in the comfort of naturally heated water. The Reykjavik Art Museum is located here, another idiosyncratic construction of minimalist white domes, blocks and sloped walls.

No matter which of the quality Reykjavik hotels you choose, there will be dramatic landmarks to see nearby. Be sure to take a walk in the city to soak up the local character and culture on your Reykjavik and Iceland holidays.

About the Author

Vikki Beale is a holiday expert for iceland2go, a specialist operator providing a selection of itineraries for the best Reykjavik holiday Iceland can provide. We arrange luxury tailor-made holidays to Iceland, Reykjavik and Greenland, with sights including glaciers, geysers, fjords, and the Northern Lights.

Capriccioso Iceland

Capriccioso Iceland

Article by Michael Drewell

Iceland is considered as a European country and it is a large mountainous island in the north of Atlantic Ocean which is between Europe and North America. In a sense, it is worthy of its name with over 10% of the country covered by glaciers, a surprisingly mild climate and countless geothermal hot springs.

Iceland is a very beautiful place if you enjoy strange and desolate landscapes. As it is so close to the Arctic Circle, the amount of daylight days varies dramatically by season. The sun sets briefly each night in June, but it doesn’t get fully dark before it comes up again. In March and September, days and nights are about equal, as elsewhere in the world. If you go there in December, it’s almost 20 hours of gloom or darkness. Summer is definitely the best time to go, and even then the tourist traffic is still mild. The midnight sun is a so beautiful sight that one definitely not to miss. It is easy to lose time when the sun is still high in the sky at 11pm. Early or late winter, however, can be surprisingly good times to visit. In late January, it is effectively light from about 10:00am to 5:00pm, and the snow-blanketed landscape is very beautiful.

Iceland was settled by Nordic and Celtic people in the 9th century AD. It is said that the first permanent settler is Ingolfur Arnarson, a Norwegian Viking who makes his home where Reykjavik now stands. The Icelanders still mainly speak the language of the Vikings. Iceland has surprisingly mild winters as a country at that latitude owing to the warming effect of the Atlantic Gulf Stream. Iceland enjoys a maritime temperate climate and the winters are often compared with those of New England. However, the rapidly changing weather has given rise to the local saying: ‘If you don’t like the weather, wait fifteen minutes’.

If you have more time for being in Iceland, you will have more tours to choose. You have the chance to go deep into Iceland by a jeep to explore the unfrequented plain and glacier. You have the chance to live in the farm for several days to make friends there with wranglers and their stocky horses. You have the chance to fly to the north of Iceland to watch the whales by the bay. You also have the chance to fly to world biggest island- Greenland- to experience the life of EskimosFor more information about traveling, please have a look at http://www.affordablecruisestours.com

About the Author

I like traveling and would like to share my experience with others.http://www.affordablecruisestours.com

Iceland’s Geothermal Success

Iceland’s Geothermal Success

Article by David Brooks

Iceland seems to be hitting the world-stage for their experience in the development of geothermal power and heating. I for one think they are on to something good.

If you asked some random people what they know about Iceland, most would say the same thing – I heard somewhere that Iceland was name that to keep people away and that Greenland was named to draw people their instead. Or, a derivation on that theme, is it true that Iceland is green and Greenland is really mostly ice? I have heard this countless times when I tell people I lived there. I am not criticizing; Iceland is not a familiar country to most people. Occasionally, though, people will know a little bit about the country and that is usually something related to geothermal.

I lived in Iceland for two years and it was a time that left quite an impression on me. Iceland is not an easy nation to characterize or label. You hear the phrase, fire & ice quite a bit which symbolizes much more than just Iceland’s geology. This phrase is a bit of an oxymoron but seems to sum up much of Iceland including its culture, economy and hardy population.

Iceland has only 300,000 people and an economy that is so small it makes you wonder how it manages on its own, but it does and quite well. One of the reason it does so well is because of it specific geographic location. The country straddles the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, right on the spreading center, or divergent boundary, between two tectonic plates, the North American and Eurasian Plates. All this makes Iceland a hot bed – no pun intended – of volcanic activity and also rich in geothermal reservoirs.

Iceland has been utilizing this geothermal power for decades and they use it to heat about 90% of all homes and produce roughly one quarter of all their electrical needs. Most of their remaining electricity needs come from hydroelectric. So, you might guess that Iceland has a clean environment and you would be right.

Iceland has also helped to transform their economy with this abundant and cheap power by attracting power intensive industries such as primary aluminum smelters. This change is controversial though as many Icelanders believe that their government is selling out one of the last pristine countries in the world. I am not taking sides, though I can understand both arguments. One the one hand, Iceland has few other natural resources and with dwindling fish stocks needs to fine away to attract foreign investment. They are doing this by commoditizing cheap, renewable electricity. On the other hand, there is certainly a value and strong argument to preserving pristine wilderness.

Why I think Iceland is going to be much better known in the coming years is by exporting their nearly unparalleled experience in geothermal development to countries all over the world. I see a future where Icelandic engineers are helping to develop geothermal reservoirs utilizing their innovations and expertise to help solve our growing energy crisis. I am a strong believer in green energy and it seems obvious that that is where we are headed whether we like it or not. So, maybe it is time to get to know this tiny island nation and make friends with all that fire and ice.

Iceland is dedicated to renewable energy development and is one of the few countries with plans to be 100% non-fossil fuel in the near future. They’ll do this with geothermal power plants and hydroelectric power plants.

About the Author

David Brooks is a customer service specialist at Blindsgalore.com, a internet retailer of window treatments, blinds, shutters and shades.

Magnificent literature of Iceland

Magnificent literature of Iceland

Article by Asberg Jonsson

Till a few years back, Iceland was also known as “the unknown land”. But for few years now, it has been given a new name i.e. “the land of  unknown surprises”. This name is given by all those tourists and visitors who have visited Iceland and witnessed these surprises themselves. Every tourist going there has only one impression in his/her mind. To see and to feel which has never been seen and never been felt before. This is Iceland-the land of surprises. Almost every visitor to Iceland wants to enjoy its untouched and unspoiled nature and also its historic background and literature. People come here to enjoy and to come closer to nature and every kind of adventures.

Let’s talk about the literature of this very splendid north European country “Iceland”. The main Icelandic literature was formed by the inhabitants of Iceland at the time of country’s settlement way back in ninth century. Because Old Norse and Icelandic are the same language that’s why, sometimes, Iceland’s medieval writings are also called Old Norse literature.

The main attraction of Iceland’s literature is the saga of medieval periods. These sagas were written between twelfth and fourteenth centuries. Sagas are basically stories about Norwegian kings and real legendry heroes. These heroes include both man and woman from the land of Iceland as well as Scandinavia. These sagas were initially composed into a prose by unknown authors. It is believed that they have been hugely recited by people and storytellers before getting written into books. Although, no original manuscript is available or exists, but there are some transcripts and collections. These are the revision and extension of the originals.

Handrit-Ágrip_af_NóregskonungasögumHundreds of sagas were written during medieval period in Iceland. These sagas are basically divided into four main parts.

[1] “The Sagas of kings” which includes snorri sturluson’s ‘heimskringla’. This saga outlines the stories of rulers of Norway from ancient time till 1777 AD.

[2] “The sagas of knytlinga” which consists the stories of Danish kings from gorm the old to canute.

[3] “The legendary sagas or the lying saga” which includes the real stories and some fantasies of romance and love stories of knights.

[4] “The sagas of Icelanders”, this category consists the whole account of the so called saga age [900 to 1050 A.D].

This category includes some evergreen sagas like Egil’s saga-the life of warrior poet; laxdaela saga-a triangular love story; gisla saga-the tragic tale of a hero. These sagas are considered the best in Icelandic literature history because they are full of complexities of human and social conflicts.

The same way i.e. the writing form of sagas was used in thirteenth century to write the contemporary history as it was also evolving around the important personalities of that time. This is popularly called “the saga of sturlunga”. This saga narrates the gruesome details of the thirteenth century which led to the conclusion of Old Icelandic commonwealth. Some other historical writings of medieval Iceland includes “the islendingabok” [the book of the Icelanders] by Ari Thorgilsson and “the lananamabok” [the book of settlements] which is also probably written by Ari Thorgilsson. Icelandic literature also includes “eddas” and the “skaldic poetry”.

After the initialization of fourteenth century, the literature of Iceland declined. It is believed that from 14th century to 19th century, nothing has been written but still the Icelandic literature has got everything, a typical literature history requires in making it notable in this world.

About the Author

Asberg Jonsson is the manager of Iceland Visitor, a company specializing in packages for Vacation in Iceland and day tours in Iceland. For more information visit www.icelandvisitor.com

FAQ’s on Iceland’s Northern Lights

FAQ’s on Iceland’s Northern Lights

Article by Vikki Beale

nordurljos-kaldarsel-snaevarr-gudmundsson

If you’re thinking of taking a northern lights tour then there really is nowhere better than Iceland to see the mythical Aurora Borealis. Iceland is placed in the most active part of the Aurora Ovals, which means that the Northern Lights can almost always be seen during the winter months just as long as the skies are clear. Here are a few of the most frequently asked questions on Iceland’s Northern Lights.

What are the Northern Lights?

Iceland’s Northern Lights are naturally occurring phenomena which happen as a result of gas produced by solar activity on the surface of the sun. When this gas hits earth it reacts with the earth’s magnetic field causing the frissons of colour which we call the Aurora Borealis.

When is the best time to see Iceland’s Northern Lights?

If you thinking of taking a Northern Lights tour in Iceland, then the best time to see these natural phenomena is during the colder periods of September through to March. Iceland’s long daylight hours make it almost impossible to view the Aurora during the summer months.

Time-wise, the best time to see Iceland’s Aurora Borealis is around midnight when Iceland’s Aurora Oval is said to pass over the observer.

Where is the best place to take a Northern Lights holiday?

To be in with the best chance of viewing Iceland’s Northern Lights you need to ensure that you are staying in an area free from any light pollution. Therefore, you need to venture out of large cities and towns into Iceland’s natural wilderness. A popular location with both locals and tourists alike is the 4* Hotel Ranga, which is located just over an hour’s drive from the centre of Reykjavik. The hotel manager, Bjorn Erikkson, conducts daily tours of Iceland’s Northern lights and with his year’s of experience, is considered to be something of an expert on the subject. The 360 degree aerial views and mountain backdrops also help to provide the perfect setting for Iceland’s stunning Aurora Borealis.

How long do Iceland’s Aurora Borealis displays last?

Typically Iceland’s Northern Light displays last for just a couple of minutes and occur a few times a night. However, large displays that last up to three hours have also been observed, although they are far less frequent. The amount of energy that is produced during these larger displays is said to be the equivalent of a small nuclear explosion.

Are there any myths or folklore surrounding Iceland’s Northern Lights?

There are plenty and your guide will almost certainly regale you with many of them during your Northern lights tour. The Aurora feature prominently in Inuit and Norse mythology and are even mentioned in the Old Testament. In Iceland it was also once believed that if pregnant women gazed at the Aurora then their children would be born cross-eyed.

What colours are Iceland’s Northern Lights?

Iceland’s Aurora Borealis respond to the different gases in the ionosphere. Whilst oxygen atoms will produce red and green light, nitrogen molecules produce a violet light. The differing colours relate to how far up in the ionosphere the gases are produced. The most common colour seen in Iceland’s Northern lights is green.

About the Author

Vikki Beale is a holiday expert for iceland2go, a specialist operator providing a selection of itineraries for the best Northern Lights tour . We arrange luxury holidays and tailor-made holidays to Iceland and Greenland, with sights including glaciers, geysers, fjords, and the Northern Lights.

Iceland – unique island with a great vision

Iceland – unique island with a great vision

Article by Dagur Jonsson

Iceland is an island just about the size of Kentucky State. This small sized island lies in the northern direction in the Atlantic Ocean just east to Greenland and it also touches the Arctic Circle. The land of Iceland is also famous as it is one of the most aggressive volcanic regions of the world. More than thirteen percent of Iceland’s total land is covered by glaciers or are snowfields. Major part of Iceland’s total population inhibits only in the seven percent part of the island because that seven percent land is considered a very fertile coastland. The gulf stream of Atlantic Ocean keeps the climate of the Iceland milder and temperature very moderate than what is expected in an island around Arctic Circle.

It is believed that the first inhabitants of Iceland were the hermits from Ireland. These hermits vacated this island when pagan Norse people arrived here in ninth century. A constitution was formed in 930 A.D and a democracy and a parliament was formed which is also known as Althing. Now Althing has the honor to be the world’s oldest still running legislative assembly. The history of Iceland is very well preserved in the Icelandic sagas written during 13th century.

In the year 1262, Iceland was occupied by Norwegian rule and was further given to the ultimate control of Denmark through the very famous ‘the kalmar union’ in which kingdoms of Norway, Sweden and Denmark united in 1397. In the year, 1874, Iceland gained their own constitution and then in 1918, Denmark recognized Iceland as a separate country and unlimited sovereignty through the act of union. By this time also, Iceland was partially under the rule of Danish monarchy. During the Second World War when Germany attacked on Denmark first the British troops and then the American troops landed in Iceland and used it as the strategic air base. According to historians, neutral Iceland supported its allies through out the war. On June 17th, 1944, after the official referendum Iceland was declared independent republic and the Althing also proclaimed it as an independent republic.

Iceland joined NATO [North Atlantic Treaty Organization] in 1949 and its maiden American air force base in 1951. In 1971 it was recognized by EFTA [European Free Trade Association]. In the year 1972, Iceland extended its fishing coastline to 200 nautical miles from 3 nautical miles. This was done without the consent of England. For this reason both Iceland and England were trapped in the dispute known as the cold wars. This dispute ended in 1976 with England agreeing to the new fishing borders of Iceland. In the year 1980, Iceland made yet another history, when it became the first country in the world to have a woman president in the office of the presidency. It was the case of the year 1990, when after the recession the economy and the financial condition of Iceland stabilized.

Iceland refused to sign the agreement which stated that moratorium of commercial whaling will continue as it was since 1986. This incident took place in the meeting of the International Whaling Commission in 2001. Finally in 2003, Iceland agreed on the initialization of hunting of whales for researches and experiments.

About the Author

Dagur Jonsson is the editor of Iceland Guest, a website specializing in tourist information for travelers to Iceland. For more information visit www.icelandguest.com

The strong culture and heritage of Iceland

The strong culture and heritage of Iceland

Article by Dagur Jonsson

Iceland is a country located in the north of Europe. The surprising thing about Iceland is that although entire Europe is connected with a very good network of railways, this is a country which can be accessed only by air transport or sea transport. The culture of this country is full of amazing colors. Infact it was because of the culture and somewhere the expectation of freedom and adventure that motivated early Vikings to settle here way back in ninth century.

Basically, it is believed that Icelanders are of Scandinavian origin with a small mixture of Celtic blood. Even now also, for every individual in Iceland, their freedom and self-respect is the thing the matters the most. The political stability is displayed in the world’s oldest parliamentary democracy. Tourists going to Iceland will notice a fact that most of Icelanders are of a classless society and that they still have a very strong literary tradition. Interest for cultural heritage of Iceland is inbuilt in every child that takes birth there and probably, this is the reason why the cultures and traditions of Iceland look very fresh. People of Iceland consider cultures and traditions as the identity of their older generations and a treasure for the generations to come. This statement is very strongly supported by the writings in Icelandic sagas and literary writing works of medieval period. Remember that these works are regarded as the classics of the world literature. Creative arts and performing arts are thriving very successfully in Iceland and it’s very heartening and motivating to see this in a land which has total population of just around three hundred thousand.

It is believed there, that the culture of Iceland is as broad as its landscape. Let me tell you that Iceland has much more than raw and unspoiled nature. Icelandic Writers, composers, actors, artists and musicians, all are very famous in the world. Some of these famous names are the names of Halldor Laxness, Jon Leifs, Kristjan Johansson, Sigur Ros and Bjork. The first class attractions of Iceland include the very famous Reykjavik art festival, the museums and the restaurants made in ancient arts. In addition to these, there are various art galleries and museums in and around Reykjavik area. The good thing about Iceland is that every region there have its own museum [urban and rural] to display the local history and facts about the atmosphere of that region. No doubt, museum of every region is worth a visit which can give you a closer view of Icelandic life and culture of both past age and present age. There are more than 15 public and private libraries in the capital area of Reykjavik. The most famous are the National and University Library of Iceland and Headquarters of Municipal Library. Every book and document related to Iceland’s past, present and future are available here.

In the past few years, music of Iceland has broken its shackles and spread all around the world and this is all because of huge success and fame gained throughout the world by some superstar musicians of Iceland like Sigur Ros, Mum, Mugison, Bjorg and The Sugar cubes. However, Iceland is not short of artists of classical, jazz, folk, experimental, dance, pop and rock music. There are many music stores in the shopping malls in Reykjavik which can provide you the huge variety of Icelandic music right from sixties to present date.

Although Iceland is considered a much unknown country to the world but the culture and the art is not unknown, Infact it is creating waves and the world of arts and cultures.

About the Author

Dagur Jonsson is the editor of Iceland Guest, a website specializing in tourist information for travelers to Iceland. For more information visit www.icelandguest.com

Iceland, an experience of a lifetime

Iceland, an experience of a lifetime

Article by Asberg Jonsson

As the name suggests, most part of Iceland is covered by snow. It is recorded that almost eleven percent of Iceland’s total area is covered by snow and ice glaciers larger than life. It may sound very unfriendly and inhospitable but the fact is that the weather here in Iceland is very cozy and easy going. It suits tourists from any part of the world.

Iceland is located in northern most part of Europe. It is basically an island in north of Atlantic Ocean but a place one would wish to go again and again, if visited once. Entire Iceland is full of surprises for the tourists that pour down there whole year. There is a typical start to Iceland’s tour, but surprises come in wholesale once you enter Iceland. Some of the surprises are mentioned below.

Volcanoes – around the central plateau, there are more than one hundred volcanoes. Out of these almost forty are active. According to stats, there is a major volcanic eruption in every five years in Iceland. But, still Icelandic volcanoes remain one of the most visited tourist destinations in Europe.

HeklaMount Hekla is the most famous active volcano of Iceland. The last eruption in this volcano was recorded in the year 2000. Other famous active volcanoes are Grimsvotn, Katla, Askja and Krafla.

Vatnajokull – this is Europe’s biggest glacier and Iceland’s major tourist attraction. Its size is about 8300 square kilometers and it covers about 8 percent of Iceland’s total land. It is the highest point in Iceland. Its highest point is named hvannadalshnukur and is about 2119 meters above sea level.

thingvellir-99-26186Thingvellir national park – this park is one of the most visited places in Iceland. The fact that this park is situated in volcanic landscape makes it even more popular. During eruptions lava flows with the border of Iceland’s largest lake. One can see “the very rare” signs of tectonic plate’s movements.

Blue lagoon – it is also one of the most visited places in Iceland. The special fact about it is that it is a natural pool of hot water with temperature between 37 and 40 degree Celsius. Its location between moss covered lava fields makes it the most photographed place of Iceland. Blue lagoon is also famous for its beneficial effects on health. This is another reason why it attracts people from all around the world.

Northern lights of Iceland – perhaps, this is Iceland’s top tourist destination in summers. The reason why is because Iceland is the perfect destination to watch these northern lights or “aurora borealis”, popularly called in Iceland. It is nature’s most spectacular and surprising event. Iceland has the privilege to be in the most active part of this magic of nature. But these northern lights are visible only on the nights when the skies are all clear.

Gullfoss waterfalls of Iceland – people of Iceland believe that this waterfall is the most beautiful place on earth. They are one hundred percent right. Gullfoss is a double folding waterfall and one of the very few in the world. It thunders around thirty two meters over the fault towards its gorge. Its gorge is 2.5 kilometers long and as deep as seventy meters at some places.

Grjótaþorp?Reykjavik: the capital – how can one forget Reykjavik, when on a tour to Iceland? It is one of the world’s most clean and peaceful cities. It has got a blend of contemporary and modern architecture. All colored in low and some bright paint, this city appears very friendly for tourists. It has got some old-fashioned buildings of eighteenth and nineteenth century. This presents the ancient side of this city.

Iceland is full of natural surprises and everyone should go their at least once in their lifetime to experience what you have never experienced and will never experience again in any other destination of the world.

About the Author

Asberg Jonsson is the manager of Iceland Visitor, a company specializing in packages for Vacation in Iceland and day tours in Iceland. For more information visit www.icelandvisitor.com